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Exeter, Devon | info.southwest@sandler.com
 

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Sales Process

Salespeople invest time developing their “pitch,” formulating questions, and preparing responses to expected questions and objections from the prospect. But, is this enough?

I read an article recently that slammed salespeople for using the “hard sell” tactic of asking for a decision at the end of a presentation.

In sales, if we are not careful, we can give away a lot of free consultancy - in our attempt to win the business. Some see it as inevitable, and resign themselves to writing multiple quotes, most of which do not close.

Salespeople invest time developing their pitch, formulating questions, and preparing responses to expected questions and objections from the prospect. They rehearse, refine, and rehearse some more.

Sandler Training clients learn how to set an ‘Up-Front Contract’- a clear, mutually accepted set of outcomes and next steps through which a buyer and a seller determine what will constitute a successful outcome of the meeting and the next steps to be taken. Sometimes that means the salesperson has to take a deep breath and resist the buyer's attempts to manipulate things.

Salespeople invest time developing their pitch, formulating questions, and preparing responses to expected questions and objections from the prospect. They rehearse, refine, and rehearse some more.

A salesperson's value is more about what information they discover from prospects, as opposed to what information they share with prospects. And nowhere is that more apparent than in budget.

How often have you been reflecting on a sales meeting thinking of something that you should have done that would have been more appropriate than what you just did?

…Don’t do it. I am often asked to help people write better quotes. These people typically tell me that they are getting a good number of leads and follow-up appointments but, at the end of each sales meeting, they are often asked to send a quote.